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Poetry and Stories by Bakugan5Ds

Literature by crashmypartyhard


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December 18, 2013
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I often wonder if machines wait.
I mean, they can sit there for decades,
in the bottom of a box,
shitty, leaky batteries and all that.
If you turned one of these machines on,
is there a hesitation in the circuitry,
a moment where the machine wakes up,
something we might call shock.

Do machines want to be used?
Do they get annoyed when we
intrude on their sleep?
I sometimes find the old machines,
like a “handheld” board game
or an old, bulky calculator.
I wonder if I should power them on.
Maybe that will make them happy.
I remember a time when all I wanted was a monopoly handheld game. Then I realized I just wanted to play monopoly with someone. 
5 ones, 5 fives, 5 tens, 6 twenties, 2 fifties, 2 hundreds, 2 five-hundreds.
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:iconderelictvampire:
DerelictVampire Featured By Owner Jun 10, 2014
Actually, what I think this is about is not some question of whether machines have consciousness but attachment to the "relics" of our past and the anthropomorphism a lonely kid will engage in. For those of us in the generation where handheld electronic games were first introduced, we still had to exercise our imaginations quite a lot since the limited technology didn't exactly create an immersive atmosphere with their little moving dots. I think we also carried over that feeling of closeness we once had with our stuffed animals, a favorite pillow, an imaginary friend--whatever came to life for us as small children--and we put it in our new, more "grown-up" toys. When you wonder at the end if turning them on will make them happy, it sounds to me like you're wondering if it'll make you happy; almost like you're searching for your own button, the one that could wake you up, make you feel alive, and, perhaps, give you a sense of purpose. A machine that's never turned on has no reason for being, and in a metaphorical way you seem to be exploring the same idea for yourself, asking: "Have I become a relic?"

I could be reading way too much into it though, ha. I hope maybe I've understood some of your intention.
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:iconjackgunski:
jackgunski Featured By Owner Jun 10, 2014
That's actually interesting. Could a person find meaning through something which is functionally meaningless?
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:icontuiskulumi:
tuiskulumi Featured By Owner Jan 10, 2014
Maybe they are content just to sleep? Who knows? I cannot say whether or not they have some sort of conscientious objection! 
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:iconshehrozeameen:
shehrozeameen Featured By Owner Dec 25, 2013  Hobbyist Writer
I looked at your description, and I wonder what you were intending on saying in this poem: What I get is a contrast with board games now becoming something of a rarity and a privilege, and being replaced by handhelds which makes sense. Although it doesn't talk about the poem (my critique) it does tend to make me wonder about whether handhelds (like a gameboy advance I used to have - God I loved that machine) really are becoming a relic like the board games. What I see in this poem, is progression...

A technological drifting of sorts. :) Nice man... for what its worth.
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:iconerosarts:
erosarts Featured By Owner Dec 19, 2013  Professional Traditional Artist
The comment here is a kind of tragic short story all on its own.

I'm a board games guy myself.
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